Tuesday, July 29, 2014

PanPastel and StencilGirl Day TWO



Day TWO!
Welcome to PanPastel Week here on StencilGirl Talk! 
We have heard from so many of you that you want to learn how to use PanPastel's with stencils. Wish granted! The extremely generous people over at PanPastel have come to the rescue and supplied the StencilGirl Team with some of their gorgeous PanPastel's to work with to show you some of our favorite techniques with stencils. Not only that, StencilGirl has put together a prize package with some of this product and a stencil, of course, to share the color love with YOU!
See giveaway information at the end of this post.

Today Janet, Jennifer and Leslie are here to show you what they made!


Janet is using the Circles Circles, Damask and Layered Salad stencils from StencilGirl.



See her project tutorial HERE.




Jennifer is using the Precocious Peony, Scribble Scratch and Sister stencils from StencilGirl.


See her project tutorial HERE.






Leslie is using the Abigail, A Timeless Woman  and Medallions stencisl.


See her project tutorial HERE.



GIVEAWAY
We know after you see all the techniques we show you this week you are going to want to play too! Enter the GIVEAWAY to be eligible to win the prize below. Just leave a comment and tell us if you use PanPastels with stencils and your favorite technique. You can also leave comments on all of the individual posts this week on all the blogs from our team members for another chance to win! All comments within the 4 day period are eligible.

GIVEAWAY closes Sunday, August 3rd @ 11:59PM Central Time.
One comment per post please.

PRIZE

Monday, July 28, 2014

PanPastel and StencilGirl Day ONE



Welcome to PanPastel Week here on StencilGirl Talk! 
We have heard from so many of you that you want to learn how to use PanPastel's with stencils. Wish granted! The extremely generous people over at PanPastel have come to the rescue and supplied the StencilGirl Team with some of their gorgeous PanPastel's to work with to show you some of our favorite techniques with stencils. Not only that, StencilGirl has put together a prize package with some of this product and a stencil, of course, to share the color love with YOU!
See giveaway information at the end of this post.

We even have one more bit of excitement to share with you!
Today we are revealing a NEW product on the StencilGirl website for sale!
Mary Beth's favorite sponges! You have seen her use them for all sorts of Mixed Media applications--now you can order her favorites to use along with your stencils..
See them HERE,



So are you ready for FOUR days of inspiration!
Let's get it started with Mary Beth and Mary C. Nasser!




Mary is working in her Art Journal today using the Doodle It Dahlia stencil.



See her project on her blog HERE.



GIVEAWAY
We know after you see all the techniques we show you this week you are going to want to play too! Enter the GIVEAWAY to be eligible to win the prize below. Just leave a comment and tell us if you use PanPastels with stencils and your favorite technique. You can also leave comments on all of the individual posts this week on all the blogs from our team members for another chance to win! All comments within the 4 day period are eligible.

GIVEAWAY closes Sunday, August 3rd @ 11:59PM Central Time.
One comment per post please.

PRIZE

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Use Your Stencils to Make Windows

If you are looking for the Traci Bautista Blog Hop, keep scrolling down the page.

Hi all, it's Gwen Lafleur back again today with another project tutorial to share. A few weeks ago I shared a mini cardboard art journal that used a lot of different stenciling techniques, and I got quite a few questions about one of the pages so I thought I'd do a tutorial showing how to use layers of stenciling to create your own little "windows."

Here's the original page I did using Circle on Circle by Mary Beth Shaw, the 6x6 peacock stencil from Jessica Sporn's January Stencil Club set, and the Quatrefoil Mix by Michelle Ward.


And here's the project I did for today's tutorial using the same process:

To get started, I put down a layer of Victorian Gray Matisse Background Paint (I found this through Mary Beth's last webinar and I really like it!) Then I used the Diamond Dance stencil by Terri Stegmiller along with some Imagine Crafts Goosebumps to get a slightly textured background - the cool thing is that it also works as a resist. It's pretty subtle... also, I didn't worry about being precise since this is one of my bottom layers.


The Goosebumps are clear, so the gray still shows even after I spray on top of it and then wipe to let the diamonds show through.You can pick any background stencil here, and use paints, inks, sprays... whatever you want. Just think ahead to what you're going to put on top... Dylusions or other water reactive products will surface color up from the bottom as you build on it, so decide whether or not that's going to matter to you.


Next, it's time to add your main image. Animals work great for this - I think the Elephant March stencil from Nathalie Kalbach or Mary Beth Shaw's Dragon stencil would be super fun. But it can be anything... I decided to do something a bit more abstract and used the Splats, Blooms, and Bones stencil by Orly Avineri. I use a stiff bristled brush to stencil with acrylic paint, but you can use a sponge, dauber, or whatever works best for you.
I put two images in there, and then used ink and a dauber to add some splats, just for a little extra background texture.
So here's the basic image I'm going to have behind my "windows."
I went in with some Molotow paint markers and added more visual interest, and also used some dimensional paints for a bit of detail.
Now... you can totally stop here. Especially if you're not comfortable covering up parts of your work (if you know me, you know I LOVE to cover stuff up!) But if that does make you squirm, try doing two pages in your journal - do one page where you go this far and stop, and at the same time, make another page where you'll keep going and cover up. It's just as easy to make two pages while you're at it, so it can be fun to experiment a bit with going outside your comfort zone!

Ready? Now it's time to grab the stencil you're going to use for your "windows." You want to make sure that there are openings big enough to see through, but you also want to make sure it's something where you can paint around the windows - you'll see that in a few steps. I took Michelle Ward's Maltese Mix stencil (she has a lot that are great for this) and laid it down on my dry page and used a pen to trace the openings where I wanted them. You can move the stencil around and take the parts of the design you want to use. It helps if you don't trace the really small shapes, unless you really want to paint around all of them!
Once that's done, it's time for some reverse painting (we'll paint the negative space.) I like to use a darker color for this - Payne's Gray works great. Take your time going around each shape.
I wanted the left side to be slightly less opaque, so I did the right side of the page first and then added some acrylic glazing liquid to my paint. You can see a bit more showing through on that side.
Now you have your windows, so it's time for some window dressing! You can use markers, fine line applicators with paint, dimensional paints... I was trying out some Imagine Crafts Irresistible Pico Embellishers and they worked really well to outline and add dots. I also used a Stabilo All Marks pencil to add a little definition to the shapes showing through the openings.
Whatever works for you to get to where you feel finished is awesome. This was it for me on this one!
 I just added a bit of journaling with my Stabilo pencil in some of the openings.

I hope you enjoyed today's project! And I hope you go and try this yourselves. If you do, link up your project! I'd love to see it!

You can see more of my work or leave me a comment or a question here or on my blog. Until next time!

Gwen

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

StencilGirl Guest Designer Jackson Gray



Hi my name is Jackson Gray and I'm a studio potter and today I would like to give you a look into the process of my pottery and how I incorporate stencils into my work. I am using the Sand Dollars and Sea Horse stencils designed by June Pfaff Daley for StencilGirl.




First I roll out a slab of clay between 3/16" boards and lightly trace my template into the slab. Looks like I can get 3 mugs from this slab. Then, I sponge on the first layer of underglaze. I am using Mayco brand, True Teal first.

Before sponging on more colors, I must make sure that each layer is no longer shiny so that the colors don't smear and get muddy. The other colors are Electra Blue, Bright Blue and Apple Green. It is easier to work with the stencils when the clay can be moved around and the stencils are cut apart, so I make the cuts and now I can focus on one mug at a time.

Once I am certain the underglaze has completely dried, I place some of the stencils and holding them tightly to the surface, sponge away the color, then carefully apply a layer of slip (fluid clay) and lift away the stencil.

Now I cut at the bevel, rough up the surface that is to be joined and apply some of the slip to the seam (scoring and slipping). I wrap the piece around a form that I have previously made. This provides a stable surface that I can press against to insure that the seam is well joined.

Now I roll my wooden tool from side to side forcing a little slip out from the joint. After cleaning up the inside seam area, I cut a circle of clay from the scrap and stamp it with my logo.

After scoring and slipping both sides of the edge of the cup and bottom disc, I press it into place and reinforce it by rolling the pony roller around the edge. Carefully I clean away the slip that oozes from the seam. Then with a tool I made from a Formica sample, I round the lip and then roll it over my hand to give an inviting edge for your mouth.

 I roll a coil to a tapered carrot shape and wet hands, pull a handle shape, allow it to curve in a natural arc and after it has stiffened a bit, I cut to size and smooth the edges.

I score and slip the parts to be joined and while supporting from the inside, I attache the handle, top and bottom. I press a small stamp of a turtle at the base to further reinforce the join. I turn the mug over and gently coax the handle to a pleasing curve and allow it to dry in this position. When the mugs are no longer cool to the touch, I load them into my kiln for bisque firing. This drives out all the remaining moisture and burns out organic materials and tightens the clay particles making the piece less fragile when glazing. This step is skipped by some potters--there are no hard and fast rules.


Jackson Gray is a full time studio potter living in San Diego CA. You can catch her work at weekend arts & crafts shows, on her website HERE or her Facebook Page HERE.